Mood Disorder

The Mood Disorders Program is a patient-centered program, designed to meet each individual patient’s needs.  With a balanced approach of medication and psychotherapy, our expertly-trained team of clinical physicians is dedicated to ensuring that each patient has a wide range of treatment options.  Treatments and other services are offered in a variety of locations, including inpatient and outpatient settings.  With an emphasis on peer collaboration, clinical research, and continuing education, the Mood Disorders Program strives to provide effective and compassionate care that enables our patients to live healthier, fuller lives.

Why We Do What We Do

“We like what we do. We see it as a privilege to do what we do. We study mood disorders. We study bipolar disorder. We study how mood disorders present early in life and how they can be best treated. We believe that there are no miracle pills and that talking with people and helping them learn how to live with the symptoms of their illness makes a big difference. We try and come up with new ideas that make a difference. We think the patient is always right, even when they are wrong. We are here to make a contribution, to improve the lives of people and their families who suffer from and live with mood disorders.”  Joseph R. Calabrese, M.D.

Our Mission

To identify the causes of Bipolar Disorder and other mood disorders, to find effective treatment, and to discover a cure.

Our research is patient-centered. This means we have designed our research studies to improve the lives of people who choose to participate in them. Our research focuses on function and disability, not just symptom improvement.

News 

  • Dr. Joseph Calabrese has been selected as one of Thomas Reuter’s "Most Influential Scientists Worldwide – Highly Cited Researchers”!!
    In the recent 2014 publication of Thomson Reuters, Dr. Joseph Calabrese was selected to be on list of the "Most Influential Scientists Worldwide – Highly Cited Researchers” within the categories of “Psychiatry/Psychology”. Highly Cited Researchers 2014 represents some of world’s leading scientific minds. Over three thousand researchers earned the distinction by writing the greatest numbers of reports officially designated by Essential Science Indicators as Highly Cited Papers. Highly cited papers rank in the top 1% by citations for their field and year of publication. Both hot papers and highly cited papers are featured in the Essential Science Indicators database of Thomson Reuters. It is precisely this type of recognition, recognition by peers, in the form of citations, that makes their status meaningful. The identification of these individuals is rooted in the collective, objective opinions of the scientific community. Fellow scientists, through their citations, give credit to these people and their work. Everyone acknowledged in this book is a person of influence in the sciences and social sciences. They are the people who are on the cutting edge of their fields. They are performing and publishing work that their peers recognize as vital to the advancement of their science. These researchers are, undoubtedly, among the most influential scientific minds of our time.

  • Robin Williams' Death Promotes Discussion About Suicide -  The news of Robin Williams' death has brought the issue of suicide prevention into focus. The University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center is hoping the spotlight on suicide will prompt people to get the help they need, before it's too late. In this news segment, Dr. Calabrese, Director of the Mood Disorders Program, reminds viewers that depression is a treatable disease.
  • A Look Inside Modern ECT Treatments - A young woman treated at University Hospitals Richmond Medical Center allows Fox 8 News to broadcast her ECT treatment so that others may become better informed about this kind of treatment. The news video features Dr. Keming Gao of the Mood Disorders Program, explaining the benefits and side effects.
  • Click here to read the remarks of the Honorable Marcie Kaptur in the U.S. House of Representatives in recognition of Dr. Joseph Calabrese, who was recently presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award by the European Bipolar Forum at its annual meeting in Seville, Spain. Marcie Kaptur is a member of the House Committee that supported research by Doctor Calabrese into the relationship between PTSD and suicidal ideation among members of the Ohio Army National Guard.
  • In this press release from the drug manufacturer, Dr. Joseph Calabrese explains the significance of the findings from a major study on a new medication for Bipolar I disease
  • Bipolar Diagnosis Eludes Many Who Suffer from the Disorder - article
  • Transformation of Psychiatry into the Clinical Neuroscience of Mental Disorders: An Update for Advocates and Consumers - article |poster
  • Joseph R. Calabrese, M.D. and the Center for Bipolar Disorder are working with Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur and the Department of Defense on the Kaptur DoD/DVA Mental Health Initiative. (Risk and Resilience Factors for Combat-Related Post-Traumatic Psychopathology and Post Combat Adjustment)
  • Are Patients with Depression at Greater Risk for Diabetes and Heart Disease? (Article)
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Mood and Metabolic Clinic 

 The Mood and Metabolic Clinic explores the relationship between metabolic syndrome and mood disorders.  Click here to access the Mood and Metabloic Clinic web page and learn more about it.

Our Team

The Mood Disorders Program is composed of both clinicians and researchers, all working together to provide patients and their families with the best possible care.


Joseph R. Calabrese, M.D.

Bipolar Disorders Research Chair & Prof. of Psychiatry
Director, Bipolar Disorders Research Center
Director, Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University
Telephone: (216) 844-2865
Fax: (216) 844-2875

Research Interests

Improvement of Clinical Outcomes in Under-served Populations of Bipolar Disorder, Including Those with Rapid Cycling, Children and Adolescents, Adults Currently Abusing Alcohol and/or Drugs, Forensic Complications of Bipolar Disorder, Those Receiving Care within Community Mental Health Centers, Older Adults, and Members of the Ohio National Guard and Reserve.

Peer-Reviewed Papers

  •       Has collaborated with 692 co-authors between 1990 and 2011
  •       Has been cited by 7,823 authors between 1990 and 2011
  •       Total citations:   32,414
  •       34.6 citations per paper (mean in Psychiatry & Psychology is 8.24)
  •       39 publications cited > 200 times as of 11/2011
  •        G-Index = 70
  •        H-Index = 89

Honors and Awards

  •       2013   Lifetime Achievement Award from the European Bipolar Forum, Awarded in Seville, Spain
  •       2012    Ohio Psychiatric Physicians Association Lifetime Achievement Award
  •       2012    European Bipolar Forum Lifetime Achievement Award
  •       2008    Gerald L. Klerman Lifetime Achievement Award
  •       2007    Awarded the Bipolar Disorders Research Chair
  •       2004    NARSAD Lifetime Achievement Award 

Selected Publications out of over 400 (All Publications)

  1. Calabrese JR, Delucchi GA: Spectrum of efficacy of divalproex in 55 rapid-cycling manic depressives. Am J Psychiatry 1990;147(4):431-4.
  2.  Calabrese JR, Bowden CL, Sachs GS, et al: A double-blind placebo-controlled study of lamotrigine monotherapy in outpatients with bipolar I depression. Lamictal 602 Study Group. J Clin Psychiatry 1999;60:79-88.
  3.  Calabrese JR, Suppes T, Bowden CL, et al: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, prophylaxis study of lamotrigine in rapid cycling bipolar disorder. J Clin Psychiatry. 2000;61:841-50.
  4.  Ketter TA, Calabrese JR: Stabilization of mood from below versus above baseline in bipolar disorder: A new nomenclature. J Clin Psychiatry. 2002;63(2):146-151.
  5.  Calabrese JR, Bowden CL, Sachs G, et al: A placebo-controlled 18-month trial of lamotrigine and lithium maintenance treatment in recently depressed patients with bipolar I disorder. J Clin Psychiatry. 2003;64:1013-1024.
  6.  Calabrese JR, Hirschfeld RMA, Frye MA, et al: Impact of depressive symptoms compared with manic symptoms in bipolar disorder: Results of a U.S. community-based sample. J Clin Psychiatry 2004;65:1499-1504.
  7. Calabrese JR, Keck PE, Jr., Macfadden W, et al: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of quetiapine, in the treatment of bipolar I or II depression. Am J Psychiatry. 2005;162:1351-1360.
  8.  Calabrese JR, Shelton MD, Rapport DJ, et al: A 20-month, double-blind, maintenance trial of lithium vs. divalproex in rapid-cycling bipolar disorder. Am J Psychiatry. 2005;162:2152-2161.
  9.  Sachs GS, Nierenberg AA, Calabrese JR, et al: Effectiveness of adjunctive antidepressant treatment for bipolar depression: A double-blind placebo controlled study. N Engl Journal Med. 2007;356:1711-22.
  10.  Kemp DE, Calabrese JR, Ismail-Beigi, F: Depressive symptoms and diabetes. JAMA 2008 Nov 12; 300(18):2115-6.
  11.  Kemp DE, Gao K, Ganocy SJ, Rapport DJ, Elhaj O, Bilali S, Conroy C, Findling RL, Calabrese JR: A 6-month, double-blind, maintenance trial of lithium monotherapy versus the combination of lithium and divalproex for rapid cycling bipolar disorder and co-occurring substance abuse or dependence. J Clin Psychiatry. 2009 Jan; 70(1):113-21.
  12.  Wang Z, Gao K, Kemp DE, Chan PK, Serrano MB, Conroy C, Fang Y, Ganocy SJ, Findling RL, Calabrese JR: Lamotrigine adjunctive therapy to lithium and divalproex in depressed patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorder and recent substance use disorder: A 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study. Psychopharmacol Bull. 2010;43(4):5-21.
  13.  Muzina DJ, Gao K, Kemp DE, Khalife S, Ganocy SJ, Chan PK, Serrano M, Conroy C, Calabrese JR: Acute efficacy of divalproex sodium versus placebo in mood stabilizer naïve bipolar I or II depression. J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 June;72(6):813-819.
  14.  Kemp DE, Ismail-Beigi F, Ganocy SJ, Conroy C, Gao K, Obral S, Fein E, Findling RL, Calabrese JR: Use of insulin sensitizers for the treatment of major depressive disorder: A pilot study of pioglitazone for major depression accompanied by abdominal obesity. J Affect Disord. 2012 Feb;136(3):1164-73.
  15.  Nierenberg AA, Sylvia LG, Leon AC, Reilly-Harrington NA, Shesler LW, McElroy SL, Friedman ES, Thase ME, Shelton RC, Bowden C, Tohen M., Singh V, Deckersbach T, Ketter T, Kocsis JH, McInnis, MG, Schoenfeld D, Bobo WV, Calabrese JR for the Bipolar CHOICE Study Group. Clinical Health Outcomes Initiative in Comparative Effectiveness for Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar CHOICE): A Pragmatic Trial of Complex Treatments for a Complex Disorder. Clin Trials 2014 Febr;11(1):114-27. 

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Darlene D. Foth, ATR-BC, PC, LSW

Clinical Coordinator, Intensive Outpatient Program
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Telephone: (216) 844-2874 | Fax: (216) 844-2836

Research Interests
Art therapy with Mood Disorder patients, Mind Body Spirit Connection & Wellness


Stephen J. Ganocy, Ph.D
.
Director, Data Management & Statistical Analysis Unit
Bipolar Disorders Research Center
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University
Telephone: (216) 844-2853 | Fax: (216) 844-2875

Research Interests
Application of Statistics to Medical Psychiatry

Selected Publications
1. Ganocy, SJ. Estimation problems from data with change points. PhD Thesis, Case Western Reserve University, 2003.
2. Shim, SS, Hammonds, MD, Ganocy, SJ and Calabrese, JR. Effect of sub-chronic lithium treatment on synaptic plasticity in the dentate
gyrus of rat hippocampal slices. Progress in Neuropsychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry 2007; 31:343-347.
3. Syamlal, G, Doney, D, Bang, KM, Greskevitch, M, Groce, D, Ganocy, S and Hoffman, W. Medical fitness evaluation for respirator users: Results of a national survey of private sector employers. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2007; 49:691-699.
4. Sajatovic, M, Elhaj, O, Youngstrom, EA, Bilali, SR, Rapport, DJ, Ganocy, SJ and Calabrese, JR. Treatment adherence in individuals with rapid cycling bipolar disorder: Results from a clinical trial setting. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 2007; 27:412-414.


Keming Gao, M.D., Ph.D
.
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry
Department of Psychiatry
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University
Telephone: (216) 844-2656 | Fax: (216) 844-2875

Research Interests
Multi-Morbid Mood Disorders, Phenomenology and Treatment of Comorbid Anxiety Disorder in Mood Disorders

Selected Publications (All Publications)
1. Gao K., Gajwani P., Elhaj O. and Calabrese JR. Typical and Atypical Antipsychotics in Bipolar Depression. J Clin Psychiatry 2005; 66: 1376-1385.
2. Gao K, Calabrese JR. Newer treatment studies for bipolar depression. Bipolar Disorders 2005; 7 (Suppl. 5):13-23.
3. Gao K, Muzina D, Gajwani P, Calabrese JR. Efficacy of typical and atypical antipsychotics for primary and comorbid anxiety symptoms or disorders: a review. J Clin Psychiatry 2006; 67:1327-1340.
4. Gao K, Ganocy SJ, Gajwani P, Muzina DJ, Calabrese JR. Sensitivity and Tolerability of Antipsychotics in Patients with Bipolar Disorder or Schizophrenia: Focus on Somnolence (J Clin Psychiatry, in press).

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Steven P. Hampl, Ph.D.
Head, Psychotherapy Services, Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University
Telephone: (216) 844-2400 | Fax: (216) 844-2875


John A. Heather, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University
Telephone: (216) 844-2400


Suzanne M. Jarm, MSN, APRN, BC

Advanced Practice Nurse, Ambulatory (Adult) Psychiatry 
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Telephone: (216) 844-2893 | Fax: (216) 844-2836


Danette Conklin, Ph.D.
Psychologist
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Telephone: (216) 844-2400 | Fax: (216) 844-2877

Cheryl Findling, MSN, CNP

Certified Nurse Practitioner
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University
Telephone: (216) 844-2400 |  Fax: (216) 844-2877

 


Paul R. Minnillo, Ph.D.

Psychologist
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Telephone: (216) 286-4360 | Fax: (216) 844-2877

Research Interests
Mechanisms of Change in Psychotherapy, Motivational Interviewing, Optimizing Psychotherapy for Bipolar Disorder, Exercise and Health

Martha Schinagle, MD
Psychiatrist
Mood & Metabolic Clinic
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University
Telephone: (216) 844-2400 | Fax: (216) 844-2877
Website: http://cwrupsychiatry.org/forpatients/whoweserve/mood-disorder/mood-metabolic-clinic


Edwin R. Shirley, Ph.D
.
Psychotherapy Services, Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Telephone: (216) 844-2400 | Fax: (216) 844-2875 

Research Interests
Mood Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, Dual Diagnosis

 

 

Brittany Brownrigg, BS

Data Coordinator 
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Telephone: (216) 983-1626 | Fax: (216) 844-2875 

 

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Carla Conroy, M.P.H. 

Research Project Manager
MPH, Master of Public Health, Cleveland State University
BA, Sociology - concentration in Criminology, Cleveland State University
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University
Telephone: (216) 844-2871
Fax: (216) 844-2875

 

Nicole A. D'Arcangelo, MSW, LSW
Research Coordinator
MSW, The Ohio State University
B.S., Lake Erie College
Telephone: (216) 286-6541| Fax: (216) 844-2875


Toyomi Goto, M.A.

Research Coordinator
Clinical Psychology Specialization, Cleveland State University
Telephone: (216) 844-2862 | Fax: (216) 844-2875

Nicole Moomaw, B.A.

Research Coordinator
BA, Case Western Reserve University
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University
Telephone: (216) 844-2463
Fax: (216) 844-2877

 

Marcie Pollack
Patient Care Coordinator II/Clinical Secretary
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University
Telephone: (216) 844-2400 | Fax: (216) 844-2877



Mary Beth Serrano, PCC

Research Operations Manager 
BA, Psychology, Bowling Green State University, MA, Counseling and Human Services, John Carroll University
Telephone: (216) 844-2861 | Fax: (216) 844-2875
 


Teresa Young

Patient Access Representative
Mood Disorders Program
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Telephone: (216) 844-2870 | Fax: (216) 844-2875
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CONTACT US

Mailing address:

Mood Disorders Program
Interventions and Services Research
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
10524 Euclid Avenue, 12th Floor
Cleveland, Ohio 44106-5923
USA

Directions

From the North

Exit I-90 at Martin Luther King Blvd. Drive on MLK for 2 miles. At traffic light turn right on to East 105th Street. Turn left on to Chester Ave and then bare right on to Stokes Blvd. The entrance to the Walker Bldg. will be on your right just after Euclid Ave.

From the South

Take I-77 North or I-71 North (both become I-90 East) to the Chester Avenue exit. Proceed east on Chester Ave. approximately 3 miles and then bare right on to Stokes Blvd. The entrance to the Walker Bldg. will be on your right just after Euclid Ave.

From the East

From the Ohio Turnpike, the suggested route is I-480 West I-271 North. Exit at Cedar Rd. Proceed west for 6 1⁄2 miles, down steep hill, and merge on to Carnegie Ave. Turn right at East 105th St, then right on to Euclid Ave. and then right on to Stokes Blvd. The entrance to the Walker Bldg. will be on your right.

From the West

Follow I-480 to I-71 North, or take I-90 East. Shortly past the merge of I-71 North & I-90 East, exit at Chester Ave. Proceed east on Chester Ave. approximately 3 miles and then bare right on to Stokes Blvd. The entrance to the Walker Bldg. will be on your right just after Euclid Ave.

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